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Does the House and Senate have to agree on a bill?

Does the House and Senate have to agree on a bill?

Ultimately, a law can only be passed if both the Senate and the House of Representatives introduce, debate, and vote on similar pieces of legislation. After the conference committee resolves any differences between the House and Senate versions of the bill, each chamber must vote again to approve the final bill text.

What happens to a bill if an agreement can not be reached by both the House and the Senate?

The four members attempt to reconcile differences between the chambers. If agreement cannot be reached, the bill “dies.” If agreement is reached, the bill returns to both chambers. Both the Senate and the House of Representatives must approve the bill before it can be sent to the governor for signature.

What happens if the House and Senate versions of a bill are different?

What happens if the House and Senate versions of a bill are different? Each version is voted on in a joint session with all members of the House and Senate. The Senate can pass its version by majority vote, and the bill then goes to the president.

What happens if the Senate and House pass two different bills on the same topic?

The bill is voted on. If passed, it is then sent to the other chamber unless that chamber already has a similar measure under consideration. If the House and Senate pass the same bill then it is sent to the President. If the House and Senate pass different bills they are sent to Conference Committee.

How does the Senate pass a bill?

If the bill passes by simple majority (218 of 435), the bill moves to the Senate. In the Senate, the bill is assigned to another committee and, if released, debated and voted on. Again, a simple majority (51 of 100) passes the bill. The resulting bill returns to the House and Senate for final approval.

What is the relationship between the House and the Senate?

The House and Senate are equal partners in the legislative process – legislation cannot be enacted without the consent of both chambers. However, the Constitution grants each chamber some unique powers. The Senate ratifies treaties and approves presidential appointments while the House initiates revenue-raising bills.

How many votes do you need in the Senate to pass a bill?

If the bill passes by simple majority (218 of 435), the bill moves to the Senate. In the Senate, the bill is assigned to another committee and, if released, debated and voted on. Again, a simple majority (51 of 100) passes the bill.

Who can introduce a bill in the Senate?

A bill can be introduced in either chamber of Congress by a senator or representative who sponsors it. Once a bill is introduced, it is assigned to a committee whose members will research, discuss, and make changes to the bill. The bill is then put before that chamber to be voted on.

Can a bill originate in the Senate?

Bills may originate in either the House of Representatives or the Senate with one notable exception. Article I, Section 7, of the Constitution provides that all bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives but that the Senate may propose, or concur with, amendments.

What can the Senate do that the House Cannot?

The Senate has the sole power to confirm those of the President’s appointments that require consent, and to provide advice and consent to ratify treaties. There are, however, two exceptions to this rule: the House must also approve appointments to the Vice Presidency and any treaty that involves foreign trade.